Candles, Fire, and Star

The deep dark quiet of December nights reminds us it is the season to listen to stories and reclaim our stories.  It is a time to remember the long, long ago time when we were children and saw the world through eyes less dimmed with human tears.  What do you remember?  What do you see?   […]

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Meeting the Buddha

The religious imagination is a wonderful companion for daily living. Imagine my shock when I had a startling twinned Buddha-encounter at 10,700 feet in China – and such insights sort of keep on happening. I can hardly believe it myself. Cynthia Johnson, a retired Unitarian Universalist minister who served UU congregations in Texas and Oklahoma, joined […]

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After exploring sources as diverse as the Buddha and clickbait, we will contemplate our lives through the lens of the good news/bad news that Woody Guthrie put this way: “Nobody else can walk it for you, You gotta walk it by yourself.” Cynthia Johnson, a retired Unitarian Universalist minister who served UU congregations in Texas […]

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Our Fellowship has taken on an ambitious and important goal: to be with one another in our aging and dying to the best of our institutional ability. This vision of community is an extraordinary commitment we make to one another. It is also true that each of us has to make peace with the fact […]

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At the turning of the year, let us be in rhythm with the season.  What are our takeaways for 2014?  How can we live most fully in 2015?   Let us be inspired by a Unitarian minister you’ve probably never met: Dr. Wendelin Waldemer Wieland Argow.  And then let’s celebrate the New Year with our Fellowship’s […]

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And They Were Sure Afraid…

Advent is a season of reflection about living in a period of waiting, resting in an in-between place, yearning for the future to unfold.  Let’s re-imagine THE Christmas Story in terms of its cast of characters being afraid at different points in their stories. What does this season have to tell us about our fear? […]

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What Are Fathers For?

In the Dick and Jane version of life in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, they and Baby Sally would have exactly one father, two grandfathers, and four great-grandfathers. It’s different today.  This Father’s Day we remember our fathers and ponder what it means to be a father/grandfather in contemporary America. How would you answer the […]

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A REFLECTION FROM SOMEONE BORN ON THE REAL MEMORIAL DAY In his poem “The Young Dead Soldiers,” Archibald MacLeish wrote: “…They say: We have given our lives; they are yours; they will mean what you make them. They say: Whether our lives and deaths were for peace and a new hope or for nothing we […]

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Stories That Echo

Sometimes a tune gets stuck in our brains.  So, too, do stories from long ago.  Two stories I revisit again and again have to do with crimes: murders, trials, juries, and verdicts — and how they affected my personal and professional lives even though I was neither a perpetrator nor a victim. Cynthia Johnson, a […]

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